It’s in our backyard

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That’s what shocked Dr. Katharine (Kate) Bushnell in the nineteenth century.  Authorities wouldn’t believe her stories of girls enticed, held captive, and abused in the pristine forests of northern Wisconsin. And today we’re hearnig such a story right in a Cleveland neighborhood- three girls held captive for ten years and no one knew?

For the last five years — off and on– I’ve been writing Kate’s story. A valiant, fearless, unconventional woman living in the Victorian era, it was a lot more difficult for Kate to talk about prostitution, rape, brothels, bondage then than it is in today’s far too open society. The pendulum swings from one side to the other. As the first book Boundless reaches completion, I’ll be writing more about what I’ve found — not only what’s happening today, but how society dealt with “trafficking” more than one hundred years ago.

Share your thoughts and stories.  It’s not a pleasant subject, but it is among us, and I believe God cares about those who are caught in this desperate quickisand.

 

 

 

 

Changing directions

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I’ve shared my joys and concerns over my trip to South Africa — and if new issues arise I’ll get back to it.  But I want to begin sharing what I see going on as threats to women around the world.  Check out the progress of Boundless, my new book about Dr. Katherine Bushnell, who spent her life trying to release women from cruelty, trafficking and disabling attitudes.

Here are two short pieces about women’s response to recent acts of violence:

In the Muslim world, society often judges a victim of rape, rather than the perpetrator.  In spiet of this, women in Turkey are now rallying around a 26-year-old mother of two who killed a man who repeatedly raped her while her husband was away on a seasonal job.  She shot the rapist as he again returned to force his way into her house.  She then turned herself in to the police, saying she preferred to die but had cleansed her honor for her children’s sake.  Intercede for the protection and salvation of this woman and her family.  Also uphold Turkish politicians who wrestle with women’s issues in a harsh male-dominated environment. TWO

India (MNN) —
Remember that rape case in New Delhi that got international attention recently?
Six men assaulted a woman aboard a moving bus, and she later died from her
injuries. The defendants’ lawyer blames her for the attack. “That attitude
is very common in India. To blame a woman for dressing inappropriately or being
in a certain place at a certain time: these are just not constructive, not helpful attitudes.” Brent Hample of India Partners says the culture is a big part of the problem. “Even before they’re born,girls are discriminated against.” If they make it past birth, young girls
are often sold into sexual slavery. “Pray that God would do a miracle within the culture of India [and] within the people of India — within their hearts.”

The important things.

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Great reminder for all of us. A second thought, the background sometimes made the words difficult to read — but I figured them out’

maddy's blog

 “The Lord gave and the Lord has taken away; may the name of the  Lord  be  praised”  Job 1 :21b

It was a beautiful winter morning. Cecil was sitting in the kitchen with his first coffee of the day, and staring out of the window. He loved mornings like this. The lawn was sparsely covered with a layer of frost, so thin the green of the grass was also poking through. The cold pale light from the early morning sun revealed itself from the hills on the distant horizon, casting an accusing glare through the mesh of winters denuded trees.

“The best time”, thought Cecil to himself as he picked up a note resting next to the phone. A list of hymns for the service this morning. Cecil was on the rota to play this Sunday. He liked the early mornings. He could drive to Crosham early and have a quick practice of the hymns before the service started.

The next step was to defrost the…

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Why do I still go to church?

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Why do I still go to church?

I’ve been going to church for ninety years. Of course I don’t remember much of those early years, but I remember the store-front German Baptist church in my early childhood. It was there at age nine I accepted Christ as my Savior and was baptized.

And I ‘ve been attending church every since — in Milwaukee, Wis; Cicero, Illinois; Johannesburg, South Africa; San Jose California; Colorado Springs and now Highlands Ranch, Colorado;

I’ve been aware that many, especially millenials , don’t find it necessary or desirable to attend church. So I wondered, why at 91 do I still go to church?

Here’s what I scribbled down this afternoon:

This is how I feel about the church: I love to worship even though I can’t sing anymore; I love to praise the Lord alongside my friends and neighbors; I need to identify publicly with the Body of Christ—I want to be known as His follower; I am still learning new things from His Word and from others who have learned to walk closely with Jesus; I want to be prepared for the persecution which is growing even in our own country; I need to be strengthened  in my faith as I see others who are facing sorrow and testings remain strong.  I love the Church with all its warts because  “the church is his body; it is made full and complete by Christ who fills all things everywhere with himself.” Ephesians 1:23

How do you feel about the church?

 Almost forgot. Daughters of Deliverance is free on Amazon through 

February 19th. 

  

Trafficking Awareness Month

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Trafficking Awareness Month

Recently I was reminded that January is National Human Trafficking Awareness Month. Let me update you with some of the unimaginable statistics–

  • $32 billion was made by traffickers last year.
  • 18.5 million slaves are in India, mostly women and children
  • 99% of all sex slaves are female.

Katharine Bushnell, the heroine of my last two books– Daughters of Deliverance and The Queen’s Daughters — was one of the early pioneers to expose the dire plight of women and #girls around the world. But she was not honored or thanked by her audiences. Victorian era women did not want to hear how cruelly their counterparts were treated , and most men refused to believe the truth.

In the nineteenth century Kate, as she is called in my books, courageously entered brothels, and chaklas (in India), to listen to the stories of the women held in sexual slavery. People were shocked to hear Kate’s stories–some even shamed her publicly for speaking about such things.

Today we have no excuse for our ignorance, for many Christian organizations are dedicated to preventing sex slavery and working to rescue girls wherever they can.

I plan to tell you more about those organizations in future blogs.You may want to start by reading Bushnell’s story of 19th century fearless activism to expose the growing subjugation of women and girls. Available on Amazon.

Black Friday book

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Black Friday book

You can’t do better than FREE.  The  Queen’s Daughter is free on Kindle today — and possibly tomorrow. 

A great read for a Christian teenager who is hearing about the #MeToo Movement and wants to know how to think about this current issue. Or your friend who loves Christian historical fiction about an exciting woman like Katharine Bushnell who bravely exposed “white slavery” one hundred and fifty years ago.

Get it FREE on your Kindle while you can.  After reading Kate’s story you’ll want to buy it for someone in your family, for a Christian teen, or a friend who’d love it.  Available on Amazon.com books.

You can also buy the first book in the Katharine Bushnell story, Daughters of Deliverance. And watch for a UTube reading from Daughters of Deliverance on my Facebook author page.

 

He will give His angels charge over you.

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He will give His angels charge over you.

Babies. No matter how many grandchildren and great-grands I have, each one  weighs the same in my heart, whether boy or girl. So I can’t help sending out a heart-warming picture of my latest (21st) great grandchild, Mia Rae Robinson.  She’s only two and a half months old but her eyes are full of anticipation of all that’s ahead.  Every day she’s learning something new– or doing something different.  I haven’t seen her for a few weeks, and this picture surprises me. She’s holding her head up to make sure that she can take in all the world around her, with eagerness and expectation of what’s ahead.

Her mom and dad are doing all they know to set the right foundation.  Tomorrow she’ll be dedicated at their church into God’s care and protection; really mom and dad are dedicating themselves to bring her up in the love and teaching of the Lord. And her extended family, grandma and grandpas, ( her 90-year-old great grandmother!) and the Body of Christ gathered in the church tomorrow morning will be witnesses to their commitment — and will promise to help them when they see that they are struggling.

I just spent a good part of ten years reading, researching and writing about a woman who never had children of her own, but whose heart was broken to find so many forced on the wrong path. It gives me special joy to see this young Christian family promising to bring their daughter up,  bathed in the love of parents and family and fed by Word of God  at home and at church.

Katharine Bushnell was born more than 160 years ago. She and her eight brothers and sisters were brought up like Mia — whose loving, godly parents set the example and encouraged their children to walk righteously. Katharine became one of the early women  medical doctors in our country. She longed to help heal bodies, but as she became aware of the cruelty and suffering so many girls and young women went through, her passion was to free their souls from sin and evil.

She didn’t know that the scourge she valiantly sought to eradicate, would today become a global sickness. Trafficking has grown to be more lucrative than the drug trade. Even on the streets here in  Denver young girls are picked up and enticed into slavery.

I look into Mia’s sparkling, trusting eyes, and pray faithfully that she’ll always be safe in the love and care of her precious family and the protection of the Holy Spirit.

This the prayer that I pray over Mia and her family:

If you make the Lord your refuge; if you make the Most High your shelter, no evil will conquer you; no plague will come near your home.  For he will order his angels to protect you wherever you go. Psalm 91:11,12

You can read the fascinating story of Katharine Bushnell’s life in “Daughters of Deliverance” and “The Queen’s Daughters” available on Amazon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Her Lifetime . . .

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In Her Lifetime . . .

When The Queen’s Daughters was released last September, Mia Rae Robinson was not in the picture. I dedicated the book to my nine great-granddaughters at the time, with these words:

I pray that in their lifetime sex slavery will become a thing of history.

I’ve added Mia Rae, my 21st great-grandchild,  to that prayer.

Today, according to the FBI, human trafficking is believed to be the third-largest criminal activity in the world .  It includes forced labor, domestic servitude, and commercial sex trafficking. It involves both U.S. citizens and foreigners alike.

Human trafficking is the third largest international crime industry (behind illegal drugs and arms trafficking). It reportedly generates a profit of $32 billion every year. Of that number, $15.5 billion is made in industrialized countries, according to the CNN Freedom Project. The average cost of a slave is $90.

Katharine Bushnell, the historical heroine of my book, The Queen’s Daughters , investigated trafficking , called white slavery in the west  in the nineteenth century. She faced danger and personal deprivation, never having a family of her own. She crisscrossed the ocean numerous times to give reports of  the heart breaking things she’d seen before government  bodies, who often refused to believe her.  (After all, no honorable woman in the Victorian era should even mention such things. )

Since Kate’s pioneering days, the scourge of trafficking has increased like  an untreated Ebola epidemic. But today many organizations are following her example to investigate, report and rescue  young girls and boys caught in this evil around the world

Perhaps Mia Rae will only know of trafficking through history books.