The Plight of Indian Women Never Ending

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This week I’m writing about Katharine Bushnell’s first contacts with the hapless young women held in the British chakla (military brothel) in 1892. I’m surrounded by articles, books, notes I’ve taken—until I feel immersed in that culture over almost 125 years ago. But. . .

The plight of women in India is never ending

Hear the story of the wife of one of the men sentenced to hang for being one of the four rapists that so damaged a young university student, she died several days later. The story has shocked India, and it seems the courts have finally seen that justice will be done.

But Punita Devi may die too. Not that she’s done anything wrong. But she’s the wife of a murderer and no one in her village or family will take her and her two year old boy in. It isn’t because of the murder; it’s because they claim they can’t afford her. The in-laws don’t want her now that their rapist son is out of work and can’t send money to cover the family’s expenses. Her own family doesn’t want her back because they are already trying to feed too many people from the small income on their one-acre holding. After-all, that’s why they married her off, and sent her with a dowry – a bed and some kitchen utensils.

Punita has had no education. She was taken out of school as a young girl to help in the home since her mother was ill. And even if she were educated, the traditions would not allow her to work outside the home. Her mother-in-law bluntly states, “In our family women die at home. They never venture outside.” The customs of purdah practiced in the region make it almost impossible for her to work outside the home.

So will Punita and her son pay the price for her husband’s crime? Where will she go for help? Oh yes, her last name, Devi, means “goddess.”

Information condensed from a full-page article in The Wall Street Journal, Tuesday, September 24,1013, A16

About lorrylutz.com

My husband and I spent 22 years working with African young people in South Africa under Apartheid, which deepened my passion for the disenfranchised. During regular returns to the US I earned my MA in Communications at Wheaton Graduate School. Later I became head of publications for Partners International and edited a quarterly magazine. In the 90's I directed the AD2000 Women's Track networking with thousands of international women leaders in Christian ministry. I have written/published twelve books on missions, biography, fiction, most recently two biographical novels about Dr. Katharine Bushnell, nineteenth century crusader against what is known today as trafficking. Daughters of Deliverance and The Queen's Daughters are available in Kindle as well as print on Amazon. I was married to Allen, now deceased, my lifelong sweetheart. We had four sons,( one deceased,) one daughter, and 18 grandchildren. How can I help but praise God for the full life He's given me, and the opportunities even in my senior years, to live purposefully.

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