Monthly Archives: March 2017

Bringing back the old

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Bringing back the old

This week I was reminded to promote other books I’ve written.  If you go to Lorry Lutz on Google, nine of my eleven published books are displayed.  It’s almost embarrassing to note that some sell for as little as 48cents!  Of course as far as books go, they’ve been around for a long time, and face hundreds of thousands  of other books which have been published since.

Three of my books are on Kindle — The Soweto Legacy, When God Says Go, and Daughters of Deliverance.  I have to admit, I like them all– but then I am prejudiced.

The Soweto Legacy was published in the 80s, but it deals with subjects as current as today.   Set in South Africa when apartheid reigned, it tells the story of a mixed-race couple (a no-no under apartheid) and how their two families handled the delicate situation. Race and ethnic hatred contrasted with love, forgiveness and God’s care as the story comes to a dramatic conclusion.

When God Says Go resembles Daughters of Deliverance, in that it is about a brave,persistent, godly woman who spends her life relieving the suffering of others.  Mother Eliza George, a daughter of American slaves, serves the tribal people of Liberia, rescuing girls from early marriage to old men,  educating them in schools she’s founded, and starting churches with pastors she’s trained.  But that’s just the framework of this true story .  Her marriage to Mr. George — really out of convenience so she could stay in Africa–is just one of the quaint  stories that emerge out her rich and colorful life. At ninety-five she’s still traveling  through the jungle, carried in a hammock by porters, straddling across a log fallen over a  swollen river, to bring the message of God to one more village.

Katharine Bushnell’s story of courage, persistence and faith is told in Daughters of Deliverance.  She spent most of her life exposing  what we call trafficking today— in the streets of Denver and Chicago,  the forests of northern Wisconsin– and later in the  barracks of the British military in India.(see my recent posts for more)

Even old books can be enjoyed — and fortunately they are all on Amazon for your enjoyment.

 

Is Daughters of Deliverance being read?

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I think I’m a pretty normal author.  I love writing and seeing my character develop. The launch of a book is a high point when I can actually hold the book in my hands or read it on my Kindle.  But then there’s the concern — is anybody reading my book?  Or was it just an ego trip, or something to keep me busy?

Royalties, of course, tell the story.  But it takes months before the reports and royalties come in.  In the meantime I wonder and wait. However, there is one indicator that gives me a hint that Daughters of Deliverance is being read.  Every day I open the  Amazon site where my book is offered.  I check the number of reviews which tells me what my readers think about my book.  Today I saw that 43 readers had written reviews (Thank-you for your response) and that Daughters of Deliverance received 4.8 gold stars out of 5. That’s soothing to my soul.

I scroll down the page  which includes all the details about the book, like the number of pages, the ISBN number– all those important things readers don’t  want to know.  And there’s a short bio of me beside my  ultra-glamorous picture . (I don’t look like that in the mirror.)

Finally at the bottom of the page Amazon lists the rank of 100 best-selling books in the Kindle store.  I’ve been shocked to see Daughters of Deliverance in the top 100 books in Inspirational fiction, Christian women’s fiction, and Inspirational.  Sometimes, like today it’s ranking 77, 84 and 90  out of 100.  Other days it’s been in the mid-30s or 40s. Considering that there are more than 42,000 books in these categories, I admit I’m pleased.  Right now the  Kindle edition of Daughters of Deliverance is being given away, so here’s your chance to put this “top-rated” book on your Kindle free!

And, kindly write a review.

 

 

 

 

Is the story of the book on the cover?

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Is the story of the book on the cover?

Book covers are designed from different perspectives.  The author wants the cover to graphically display the purpose and heart of the book.. The artist tries to display his or her  artistic abilities .  The publisher wants a cover that  “sells!” The reader hopes the cover will tell her what this book is about.

Not every reader realizes that the author seldom has any control over the cover.  She may give suggestions– even a rough design, which may or not be used.  And as most authors’ contracts say, ‘the final decision rests with the publisher’.

Over the years I’ve had cover designs I’ve loved, and some I haven’t appreciated.  I received a suggested cover from Paternoster in England for Women as Rick Takers for God— a silhouette of two women’s faces, nose to nose, as though in confrontation. Instead the book was about women as leaders in the church around the world, joyfully and lovingly serving God.  I guess my disconcerted call from Turkey, where I was visiting my son, convinced the publisher he should try again.  And try he did with a creative cover that stands out from the rest.

I have included here the cover of my latest book, Daughters of Deliverance.  Do I like it?  Welllll– yes because it is very colorful  and attracts readers, which will please the publisher and probably my pocketbook.  But it doesn’t tell the story.  In fact, if you haven’t read Daughters of Deliverance  or the information on the back cover or on Amazon — what does it say to you?

Tell me, what do you look for in a cover?  What causes you to pick up the book , or click on Amazon’s picture to open and read?  I’m about ready to make suggestions for the sequel to Daughters of Deliverance.  It is titled The Queen’s Daughters. Consider yourself the artist for a moment.  You know little about the story — you really don’t have tie to read all the books you work on.  How would your cover fit the title?