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In Her Lifetime . . .

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In Her Lifetime . . .

When The Queen’s Daughters was released last September, Mia Rae Robinson was not in the picture. I dedicated the book to my nine great-granddaughters at the time, with these words:

I pray that in their lifetime sex slavery will become a thing of history.

I’ve added Mia Rae, my 21st great-grandchild,  to that prayer.

Today, according to the FBI, human trafficking is believed to be the third-largest criminal activity in the world .  It includes forced labor, domestic servitude, and commercial sex trafficking. It involves both U.S. citizens and foreigners alike.

Human trafficking is the third largest international crime industry (behind illegal drugs and arms trafficking). It reportedly generates a profit of $32 billion every year. Of that number, $15.5 billion is made in industrialized countries, according to the CNN Freedom Project. The average cost of a slave is $90.

Katharine Bushnell, the historical heroine of my book, The Queen’s Daughters , investigated trafficking , called white slavery in the west  in the nineteenth century. She faced danger and personal deprivation, never having a family of her own. She crisscrossed the ocean numerous times to give reports of  the heart breaking things she’d seen before government  bodies, who often refused to believe her.  (After all, no honorable woman in the Victorian era should even mention such things. )

Since Kate’s pioneering days, the scourge of trafficking has increased like  an untreated Ebola epidemic. But today many organizations are following her example to investigate, report and rescue  young girls and boys caught in this evil around the world

Perhaps Mia Rae will only know of trafficking through history books.

 

 

 

Blessed are the pure in heart

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Blessed are the pure in heart

Emma, my ten-year-old great- granddaughter, can’t wait to read Great-grandma’s book.  When her mom brought the Daughters of Deliverance home, the smile on her face tells it all .  Ten might be a little young . Thankfully the concepts of trafficking and slavery are still beyond her, but I know she’ll admire my historical  heroine, Katharine Bushnell, and her  passion to rescue girls from evil.*

I love her sweet innocent face,  I’m thankful she’s growing up in a family where she’s loved and protected; where her big brothers would never allow anyone to hurt her; and where her parents teach her the Bible and pray for her  to grow up knowing God loves her.

One day she’ll find out that since Kate’s discovery and exposure of “white slavery” in the United States in the late 1800’s,  the tragic  practice has only grown worse.

There are approximately 20 to 30 million slaves in the world today. According to the U.S. State Department, 600,000 to 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders every year, of which 80% are female and half are children. — Cortana

*Though the book deals with adult subjects, I’ve written Kate’s story without sordid details. In fact, Kate’s  faith and obedience to God as she finds herself in difficult situations, is what my readers are telling me challenges them  the most.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Praise for The Queen’s Daughters

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Occasionally I’ve found that someone else can describe the purpose of my books more clearly than I can.  This is the case with  an endorsement I received for The Queen’s Daughters.

The future for girls would look brighter if we all took to heart the wisdom of  The Queen’s Daughters. It is not the hideous thought of sexual abuse that changes the future for girls.  It is the love and persistent effort of men and women like Katharine Bushnell whose story inspired the second of two novels by Lorry Lutz.  To journey with Katharine Bushnell into the uncharted territory of shielding girls from sexual slavery is not only profoundly eye opening,  it is deeply inspiring.

Daniel Rickett, Ph.D.

Executive Vice President, She Is Safe, Inc.

 I’m impressed that this endorsement was written by a man.  Generally historical novels, especially about women, are read by women.  But when men read Katharine’s story they are incredulous about the abuse women and girls suffer — and that it’s been going on so long.  Katharine was a pioneer in the late nineteenth century to expose the abuse, and to courageously get “in your face” with politicians and powerful men who could do something about it.

Go to The Queen’s Daughters on Amazon.  I hear they plan to raise the price for the print book soon.  Watch for special offers for free or 99c e-books. As a writer I feel cheapened to see my hard work sold at that price– but I understand it helps sales. And it’s great for my readers.

Dan Rickett is just one of other men who have found Kate’s story challenging. If you’re a wife, you might add this book to your husband’s Christmas gifts, or read it together. I promise you there are no “purple patches” (salacious scenes). The story is set in the Victorian era!

 

 

 

Under the Banana Tree

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Under the Banana Tree

Three days before I left Kenya this summer I made a short video about The Queen’s Daughters. Adams, who heads up the media equipment department at  Daystar University, brought his camera. I watched  him through my window, moving a chair from one spot to another — aah, he was looking for just the right spot.  He finally moved the chair part way up the side of the massive rock  behind the house, near a young banana tree (no bananas yet–the ones I’m holding aren’t from that little tree!) Once he was sure the background and the lighting were just right he called me to come.

That was the first problem– I’m  not good at climbing anything these days, though I didn’t tell him that.  I stepped carefully, trying to avoid stones and anything unstable. But I suddenly  jammed  my foot between two rocks , and I went down on my knees, screaming.  Of course Adams and Wekesa, a student working in the garden, came running to help–  “Mum Lorry!” But I didn’t want them to lift me up — I was afraid they’d drop me and all three of us would roll down the hill. They knew better. Each grabbed an upper arm and as though I was light as a bird, up I went.  No damage– just my pride.

Hence, the video I was about to show you is a little shaky from that experience, but will tell you how I learned some things while in Africa that made me even more thankful for the privilege of writing Dr. Katharine Bushnell’s story in The Queen’s Daughters  (released in September).

Hopefully by the next time I’ll have figured out how to import a UTube into my blog.  Any ideas? Unfortunately this edition of the video  here doesn’t work. But go  back to Facebook and open the video posted today — October 5. I’m still a bit shaky but the stories are true.

 

 

 

Tomorrow I’m having a “book-baby!”

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Tomorrow I’m having a “book-baby!”

This is my twelfth “book baby” and one was stillborn 😦  At times I still wonder if that first struggle to write a book could be brought back to life?  It had a rather strange title–“How to Bring about Change Without Everybody Getting Mad at You?”  I guess it didn’t fly then, because I couldn’t find the answer.  The manuscript was all about  being hurt — and what the people who were mad at me–and my husband–did.  Maybe when I turn ninety (next February) I will haul it off the shelf and read through those typed pages again. I suspect the answer would come as I read. God has certainly given me more insight and understanding of relationships after almost fifty more years of living!

I’m not having a big launch party for The Queen’s Daughters.  It’s not that she isn’t worth it — my, the adventures  Katharine Bushnell and Bess Andrews had in India should keep my readers awake! When they both got stuck in Peshawar at the end of the Kyber pass (from Kabul,Afghanistan) I had a hard time getting them out of there myself.

The launch of a twelfth book is something like launching the fifth child in a family. Relatives visit and send cards  and gifts when the first grandchild is born– and in this century the cellphone lines are hot with baby pictures.  But my fifth baby started life on the road in  the back bedroom of our 42-foot trailer as we traveled across the country meeting people and speaking in churches about our youth work in South Africa.  In one church a dear lady felt sorry for our baby, and offered to take him home and care for him the whole week we were there!! (I wish she knew what a godly, sensitive, caring man he turned out to be, and how much he was and is loved by the whole family!)

Well, back to  — THE QUEEN’S DAUGHTERS. She’s my twelfth and fulfills my dream of birthing a book that will challenge readers  with  Kate’s passion and risk-taking efforts to overcome injustice.

Tomorrow– September 1– is the day.  If you enjoyed Daughters of Deliverance you’ll be eager to read the sequel, The Queen’s Daughters. Please write a review at the bottom of the book’s page in Amazon–it helps so much to get the word out to others!

The Setting of The Queen’s Daughters

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The Setting of The Queen’s Daughters

I visited India for the first time  in 1979, but my memories are still vivid.  Most of the cars on the roads were black  Ambassadors, manufactured in India.  No bells and whistles, but the drivers cleverly maneuvered around cows in the road, and daring pedestrians forging ahead through the traffic.

One night we stayed in a guest-room across from a park  full of peacocks.  We looked forward to seeing them in the morning, especially the males, proud in their plumage of yellow,blue,and green feathers.  What we didn’t know when we laid our weary heads on the bumpy pillows and longed for a breath of moving air, was that our peacock neighbors couldn’t sleep either. They were awake at sunrise, greeting each other with the loudest, most raucous, ugly sounding calls you can imagine — and multiply that by one hundred or more birds.

India is a fascinating, colorful  land to visit, though the sight of beggars living along the side of the streets, or a mother in a bedraggled sari, standing in the middle of traffic, her hand outstretched  for food for the baby in her arms and the toddlers clinging  to her skirts, was always heart-breaking. As I traveled frequently to India over the years, beggars became less visible (perhaps by some municipal regulations?) and the cities looked more prosperous.

My early travels in India  were far less comfortable than today. We seldom had air-conditioning in the moderate guest houses where we stayed, and suffered frequent loss of electrical power.  We often rode on rickshaws drawn  by men whose powerful muscles in their arms and legs kept their bony frames moving through traffic with ‘seeming’ ease.

 I could go on, but I think this will help you to understand why I especially enjoyed researching and writing  Dr. Katharine Bushnell’s experience in India eighty-five years earlier.  The challenges were greater, but she was determined to expose the mistreatment of  young Indian women in the brothels of the military  during the British Raj, and to help free any she could.

A historical novel, The Queen’s Daughters is the second book about the life of Katharine Bushnell. It is set in Victorian England, British India, and the Far East.  There’s joy, victory and obedience to God’s call on her life, even though the subject matter may seem dark at times. If you like to read books about strong women who served God in unexpected places, you’ll enjoy getting to know Dr. Katharine Bushnell. The Queen’s Daughters  is available on Amazon, September 1, 2017,