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Praise for The Queen’s Daughters

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Occasionally I’ve found that someone else can describe the purpose of my books more clearly than I can.  This is the case with  an endorsement I received for The Queen’s Daughters.

The future for girls would look brighter if we all took to heart the wisdom of  The Queen’s Daughters. It is not the hideous thought of sexual abuse that changes the future for girls.  It is the love and persistent effort of men and women like Katharine Bushnell whose story inspired the second of two novels by Lorry Lutz.  To journey with Katharine Bushnell into the uncharted territory of shielding girls from sexual slavery is not only profoundly eye opening,  it is deeply inspiring.

Daniel Rickett, Ph.D.

Executive Vice President, She Is Safe, Inc.

 I’m impressed that this endorsement was written by a man.  Generally historical novels, especially about women, are read by women.  But when men read Katharine’s story they are incredulous about the abuse women and girls suffer — and that it’s been going on so long.  Katharine was a pioneer in the late nineteenth century to expose the abuse, and to courageously get “in your face” with politicians and powerful men who could do something about it.

Go to The Queen’s Daughters on Amazon.  I hear they plan to raise the price for the print book soon.  Watch for special offers for free or 99c e-books. As a writer I feel cheapened to see my hard work sold at that price– but I understand it helps sales. And it’s great for my readers.

Dan Rickett is just one of other men who have found Kate’s story challenging. If you’re a wife, you might add this book to your husband’s Christmas gifts, or read it together. I promise you there are no “purple patches” (salacious scenes). The story is set in the Victorian era!

 

 

 

Under the Banana Tree

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Under the Banana Tree

Three days before I left Kenya this summer I made a short video about The Queen’s Daughters. Adams, who heads up the media equipment department at  Daystar University, brought his camera. I watched  him through my window, moving a chair from one spot to another — aah, he was looking for just the right spot.  He finally moved the chair part way up the side of the massive rock  behind the house, near a young banana tree (no bananas yet–the ones I’m holding aren’t from that little tree!) Once he was sure the background and the lighting were just right he called me to come.

That was the first problem– I’m  not good at climbing anything these days, though I didn’t tell him that.  I stepped carefully, trying to avoid stones and anything unstable. But I suddenly  jammed  my foot between two rocks , and I went down on my knees, screaming.  Of course Adams and Wekesa, a student working in the garden, came running to help–  “Mum Lorry!” But I didn’t want them to lift me up — I was afraid they’d drop me and all three of us would roll down the hill. They knew better. Each grabbed an upper arm and as though I was light as a bird, up I went.  No damage– just my pride.

Hence, the video I was about to show you is a little shaky from that experience, but will tell you how I learned some things while in Africa that made me even more thankful for the privilege of writing Dr. Katharine Bushnell’s story in The Queen’s Daughters  (released in September).

Hopefully by the next time I’ll have figured out how to import a UTube into my blog.  Any ideas? Unfortunately this edition of the video  here doesn’t work. But go  back to Facebook and open the video posted today — October 5. I’m still a bit shaky but the stories are true.

 

 

 

Tomorrow I’m having a “book-baby!”

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Tomorrow I’m having a “book-baby!”

This is my twelfth “book baby” and one was stillborn 😦  At times I still wonder if that first struggle to write a book could be brought back to life?  It had a rather strange title–“How to Bring about Change Without Everybody Getting Mad at You?”  I guess it didn’t fly then, because I couldn’t find the answer.  The manuscript was all about  being hurt — and what the people who were mad at me–and my husband–did.  Maybe when I turn ninety (next February) I will haul it off the shelf and read through those typed pages again. I suspect the answer would come as I read. God has certainly given me more insight and understanding of relationships after almost fifty more years of living!

I’m not having a big launch party for The Queen’s Daughters.  It’s not that she isn’t worth it — my, the adventures  Katharine Bushnell and Bess Andrews had in India should keep my readers awake! When they both got stuck in Peshawar at the end of the Kyber pass (from Kabul,Afghanistan) I had a hard time getting them out of there myself.

The launch of a twelfth book is something like launching the fifth child in a family. Relatives visit and send cards  and gifts when the first grandchild is born– and in this century the cellphone lines are hot with baby pictures.  But my fifth baby started life on the road in  the back bedroom of our 42-foot trailer as we traveled across the country meeting people and speaking in churches about our youth work in South Africa.  In one church a dear lady felt sorry for our baby, and offered to take him home and care for him the whole week we were there!! (I wish she knew what a godly, sensitive, caring man he turned out to be, and how much he was and is loved by the whole family!)

Well, back to  — THE QUEEN’S DAUGHTERS. She’s my twelfth and fulfills my dream of birthing a book that will challenge readers  with  Kate’s passion and risk-taking efforts to overcome injustice.

Tomorrow– September 1– is the day.  If you enjoyed Daughters of Deliverance you’ll be eager to read the sequel, The Queen’s Daughters. Please write a review at the bottom of the book’s page in Amazon–it helps so much to get the word out to others!

The Setting of The Queen’s Daughters

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The Setting of The Queen’s Daughters

I visited India for the first time  in 1979, but my memories are still vivid.  Most of the cars on the roads were black  Ambassadors, manufactured in India.  No bells and whistles, but the drivers cleverly maneuvered around cows in the road, and daring pedestrians forging ahead through the traffic.

One night we stayed in a guest-room across from a park  full of peacocks.  We looked forward to seeing them in the morning, especially the males, proud in their plumage of yellow,blue,and green feathers.  What we didn’t know when we laid our weary heads on the bumpy pillows and longed for a breath of moving air, was that our peacock neighbors couldn’t sleep either. They were awake at sunrise, greeting each other with the loudest, most raucous, ugly sounding calls you can imagine — and multiply that by one hundred or more birds.

India is a fascinating, colorful  land to visit, though the sight of beggars living along the side of the streets, or a mother in a bedraggled sari, standing in the middle of traffic, her hand outstretched  for food for the baby in her arms and the toddlers clinging  to her skirts, was always heart-breaking. As I traveled frequently to India over the years, beggars became less visible (perhaps by some municipal regulations?) and the cities looked more prosperous.

My early travels in India  were far less comfortable than today. We seldom had air-conditioning in the moderate guest houses where we stayed, and suffered frequent loss of electrical power.  We often rode on rickshaws drawn  by men whose powerful muscles in their arms and legs kept their bony frames moving through traffic with ‘seeming’ ease.

 I could go on, but I think this will help you to understand why I especially enjoyed researching and writing  Dr. Katharine Bushnell’s experience in India eighty-five years earlier.  The challenges were greater, but she was determined to expose the mistreatment of  young Indian women in the brothels of the military  during the British Raj, and to help free any she could.

A historical novel, The Queen’s Daughters is the second book about the life of Katharine Bushnell. It is set in Victorian England, British India, and the Far East.  There’s joy, victory and obedience to God’s call on her life, even though the subject matter may seem dark at times. If you like to read books about strong women who served God in unexpected places, you’ll enjoy getting to know Dr. Katharine Bushnell. The Queen’s Daughters  is available on Amazon, September 1, 2017,

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bringing back the old

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Bringing back the old

This week I was reminded to promote other books I’ve written.  If you go to Lorry Lutz on Google, nine of my eleven published books are displayed.  It’s almost embarrassing to note that some sell for as little as 48cents!  Of course as far as books go, they’ve been around for a long time, and face hundreds of thousands  of other books which have been published since.

Three of my books are on Kindle — The Soweto Legacy, When God Says Go, and Daughters of Deliverance.  I have to admit, I like them all– but then I am prejudiced.

The Soweto Legacy was published in the 80s, but it deals with subjects as current as today.   Set in South Africa when apartheid reigned, it tells the story of a mixed-race couple (a no-no under apartheid) and how their two families handled the delicate situation. Race and ethnic hatred contrasted with love, forgiveness and God’s care as the story comes to a dramatic conclusion.

When God Says Go resembles Daughters of Deliverance, in that it is about a brave,persistent, godly woman who spends her life relieving the suffering of others.  Mother Eliza George, a daughter of American slaves, serves the tribal people of Liberia, rescuing girls from early marriage to old men,  educating them in schools she’s founded, and starting churches with pastors she’s trained.  But that’s just the framework of this true story .  Her marriage to Mr. George — really out of convenience so she could stay in Africa–is just one of the quaint  stories that emerge out her rich and colorful life. At ninety-five she’s still traveling  through the jungle, carried in a hammock by porters, straddling across a log fallen over a  swollen river, to bring the message of God to one more village.

Katharine Bushnell’s story of courage, persistence and faith is told in Daughters of Deliverance.  She spent most of her life exposing  what we call trafficking today— in the streets of Denver and Chicago,  the forests of northern Wisconsin– and later in the  barracks of the British military in India.(see my recent posts for more)

Even old books can be enjoyed — and fortunately they are all on Amazon for your enjoyment.

 

Is Daughters of Deliverance being read?

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I think I’m a pretty normal author.  I love writing and seeing my character develop. The launch of a book is a high point when I can actually hold the book in my hands or read it on my Kindle.  But then there’s the concern — is anybody reading my book?  Or was it just an ego trip, or something to keep me busy?

Royalties, of course, tell the story.  But it takes months before the reports and royalties come in.  In the meantime I wonder and wait. However, there is one indicator that gives me a hint that Daughters of Deliverance is being read.  Every day I open the  Amazon site where my book is offered.  I check the number of reviews which tells me what my readers think about my book.  Today I saw that 43 readers had written reviews (Thank-you for your response) and that Daughters of Deliverance received 4.8 gold stars out of 5. That’s soothing to my soul.

I scroll down the page  which includes all the details about the book, like the number of pages, the ISBN number– all those important things readers don’t  want to know.  And there’s a short bio of me beside my  ultra-glamorous picture . (I don’t look like that in the mirror.)

Finally at the bottom of the page Amazon lists the rank of 100 best-selling books in the Kindle store.  I’ve been shocked to see Daughters of Deliverance in the top 100 books in Inspirational fiction, Christian women’s fiction, and Inspirational.  Sometimes, like today it’s ranking 77, 84 and 90  out of 100.  Other days it’s been in the mid-30s or 40s. Considering that there are more than 42,000 books in these categories, I admit I’m pleased.  Right now the  Kindle edition of Daughters of Deliverance is being given away, so here’s your chance to put this “top-rated” book on your Kindle free!

And, kindly write a review.

 

 

 

 

Is the story of the book on the cover?

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Is the story of the book on the cover?

Book covers are designed from different perspectives.  The author wants the cover to graphically display the purpose and heart of the book.. The artist tries to display his or her  artistic abilities .  The publisher wants a cover that  “sells!” The reader hopes the cover will tell her what this book is about.

Not every reader realizes that the author seldom has any control over the cover.  She may give suggestions– even a rough design, which may or not be used.  And as most authors’ contracts say, ‘the final decision rests with the publisher’.

Over the years I’ve had cover designs I’ve loved, and some I haven’t appreciated.  I received a suggested cover from Paternoster in England for Women as Rick Takers for God— a silhouette of two women’s faces, nose to nose, as though in confrontation. Instead the book was about women as leaders in the church around the world, joyfully and lovingly serving God.  I guess my disconcerted call from Turkey, where I was visiting my son, convinced the publisher he should try again.  And try he did with a creative cover that stands out from the rest.

I have included here the cover of my latest book, Daughters of Deliverance.  Do I like it?  Welllll– yes because it is very colorful  and attracts readers, which will please the publisher and probably my pocketbook.  But it doesn’t tell the story.  In fact, if you haven’t read Daughters of Deliverance  or the information on the back cover or on Amazon — what does it say to you?

Tell me, what do you look for in a cover?  What causes you to pick up the book , or click on Amazon’s picture to open and read?  I’m about ready to make suggestions for the sequel to Daughters of Deliverance.  It is titled The Queen’s Daughters. Consider yourself the artist for a moment.  You know little about the story — you really don’t have tie to read all the books you work on.  How would your cover fit the title?