Passionate to save girls like this

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Passionate to save girls like this

I confess, this endorsement comes from a friend– an intellectual, well-read  woman with a  Ph.D.  behind her name. So when she wrote this review, I felt that I should  share it with you.

If you haven’t read Daughters of Deliverance or The Queen’s Daughters yet, you might want to do so after reading her reaction.  Getting to know the  Victorian heroine, Katharine Bushnell, who passionately tried to help girls  like the one on the cover, will warm your heart. You’ll be challenged to pray more faithfully for women and girls still caught in trafficking  today.  My friend writes:

It is wonderful to see her story come to life, and you’ve done a marvelous job. What I like best is how accessible it is, and how she battles the very real emotions and challenges we all face. You retain her powerful intellectual and spiritual gifts, but place it inside a very human woman! I love that. Thank you again for the honor of sharing in your journey, and I’m thrilled you’ll devote the early hours of prayer this coming year to seeking, prayerfully, God’s guidance on the next focus of your life.

And that means she’s challenging me  to find God’s purpose after my 90th birthday  in February for the next season of my life

Imagination at Work.

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Imagination at Work.

Many of the characters in my book, Daughters of Deliverance  are real.  They are not  famous, but people who played a part in a true story.  As I did the research I dug around to find more details, but often I had very little facts  to bring these people alive in the book. That’s when the fictional side of the story breaks in — the fun part when my imagination takes over.

If you read my book, Daughters of Deliverance-, you’ll remember  Ella Gilchrist, the young missionary doctor who came down with tuberculosis in China. I found  her  mentioned in a few articles about Katharine Bushnell’s early life in China and  when Kate accompanied Ella home  where she  eventually died of TB.

Of course, as I wrote about her illness, the difficult sea voyage and train ride across America to Denver. Ella grew to be  a real person in my mind.  I could see her perspiring under the mosquito net  at Kuikiang mission, and shivering with fever on the uncomfortable train journey. Never complaining, always wanting to serve Jesus, apologizing to cause Kate more work.  But she only lived in my imagination until a week ago when I received an email from my friend Mimi.

Mim encouraged her friend Karen to read Daughters of Deliverance — and there Karen discovered that her great-great aunt, Ella Gilchreist (CORRECT SPELLING !)  worked with Dr Bushnell at the Methodist Mission in Kuikiang, China.  Of course, Karen had never met her Great-great Aunt Ella, but she’d heard stories about her — and, SHE HAD A PICTURE.

I finally got to meet Dr. Ella– and she looked amazingly like the image I carried in my mind. If you haven’t read Daughters of Deliverance yet,  keep this picture and when you meet Ella in the story, bring it out. Do you think  my Ella in the book matches her picture?

 

 

 

An idea for the men on your list? What?

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An idea for the men on your list? What?

This morning after church one of the young mothers stopped me in the hall to tell me, “My husband is reading your book and he really likes it”  We  discussed  the cover which she said was  “girly,” but the subject matter –“white slavery” (today’s trafficking)– is of interest to both male and female.

Before Daughters of Deliverance launched last December, I sent the PDF to my son  who is teaching overseas. (Sons are very direct and honest so I was a bit leery of what he might say.) He  remarked he really liked the book, but he thought that I was a bit hard on men, that there weren’t good men in the story.  I reminded him of Kate’s wise father, the contractor for the Evanston lighthouse, still standing today; or Senator Fitch who rallied the Wisconsin legislature  to pass a law against the den keepers;  or even David, the young medical student who wanted to ask her parents for permission to court her. My son  admitted there were some good men in the story, but that they were overshadowed by men like Blonger who ruled the streets of Chicago’s Hell’s Half Acre.  I still hear him say, “Mom, I didn’t think such things went on in the nineteenth century.”

I suspect few men will read Daughters of Deliverance,  or its sequel, The Queen’s Daughters,” launched this past September, because they think it’s about   girls.  And the main character is a woman, Katharine Bushnell, the historic heroine of the story. She was a famous activist against sex slavery and a  woman of prayer and obedience to God’s call on her life (sordid as it may seem at times.)

Two men have written endorsements for these books. Larry Andrews is the president of Partners International which, among other ministries, repatriates girls kidnapped into sex slavery.  Dr. Dan Rickett serves as executive vice president for She Is Safe.

Christmas is almost here.   Perhaps you could give one of the men in your life — husband, brother, son–a copy of Destined for Loyalty or The Queen’s Daughters.  Tell them they are based on the true story of a  woman in the nineteenth century who obeyed God and went through danger and hardship to rescue girls out of evil situations that are still going on today.
And, Oh yes, the books are available as Kindle ebooks in India and England!

 

 

 

Praise for The Queen’s Daughters

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Occasionally I’ve found that someone else can describe the purpose of my books more clearly than I can.  This is the case with  an endorsement I received for The Queen’s Daughters.

The future for girls would look brighter if we all took to heart the wisdom of  The Queen’s Daughters. It is not the hideous thought of sexual abuse that changes the future for girls.  It is the love and persistent effort of men and women like Katharine Bushnell whose story inspired the second of two novels by Lorry Lutz.  To journey with Katharine Bushnell into the uncharted territory of shielding girls from sexual slavery is not only profoundly eye opening,  it is deeply inspiring.

Daniel Rickett, Ph.D.

Executive Vice President, She Is Safe, Inc.

 I’m impressed that this endorsement was written by a man.  Generally historical novels, especially about women, are read by women.  But when men read Katharine’s story they are incredulous about the abuse women and girls suffer — and that it’s been going on so long.  Katharine was a pioneer in the late nineteenth century to expose the abuse, and to courageously get “in your face” with politicians and powerful men who could do something about it.

Go to The Queen’s Daughters on Amazon.  I hear they plan to raise the price for the print book soon.  Watch for special offers for free or 99c e-books. As a writer I feel cheapened to see my hard work sold at that price– but I understand it helps sales. And it’s great for my readers.

Dan Rickett is just one of other men who have found Kate’s story challenging. If you’re a wife, you might add this book to your husband’s Christmas gifts, or read it together. I promise you there are no “purple patches” (salacious scenes). The story is set in the Victorian era!

 

 

 

THE DAY OF THE GIRL-OCT. 11

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This will make you weep! Read these statistics from She Is Safe which focuses  on Preventing,  Rescuing, and Restoring  young women around the world in danger of being trafficked:

  • 200 million girls are “missing” from the world today.
  • 98% of sex slaves are female. Demand is rising for younger girls.
  • 90% of poor families in India do not educate their girls.
  • 52 million girls under the age of 18 are forced to marry each year.

On the other hand:

  • Girls will invest 90% of what they earn back into their families.
  • Girls who are safe, free, equipped and know their God-given value will raise the next generations of boys and girls to be safe, free, educated and contributing.

For more information contact : infor@sheissafe.org

And to read the story of a committed, persistent woman risking her life and reputation to expose”white slavery” (trafficking) in the 19th century, read my recently released Daughters of Deliverance and The Queen’s Daughters

 

Under the Banana Tree

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Under the Banana Tree

Three days before I left Kenya this summer I made a short video about The Queen’s Daughters. Adams, who heads up the media equipment department at  Daystar University, brought his camera. I watched  him through my window, moving a chair from one spot to another — aah, he was looking for just the right spot.  He finally moved the chair part way up the side of the massive rock  behind the house, near a young banana tree (no bananas yet–the ones I’m holding aren’t from that little tree!) Once he was sure the background and the lighting were just right he called me to come.

That was the first problem– I’m  not good at climbing anything these days, though I didn’t tell him that.  I stepped carefully, trying to avoid stones and anything unstable. But I suddenly  jammed  my foot between two rocks , and I went down on my knees, screaming.  Of course Adams and Wekesa, a student working in the garden, came running to help–  “Mum Lorry!” But I didn’t want them to lift me up — I was afraid they’d drop me and all three of us would roll down the hill. They knew better. Each grabbed an upper arm and as though I was light as a bird, up I went.  No damage– just my pride.

Hence, the video I was about to show you is a little shaky from that experience, but will tell you how I learned some things while in Africa that made me even more thankful for the privilege of writing Dr. Katharine Bushnell’s story in The Queen’s Daughters  (released in September).

Hopefully by the next time I’ll have figured out how to import a UTube into my blog.  Any ideas? Unfortunately this edition of the video  here doesn’t work. But go  back to Facebook and open the video posted today — October 5. I’m still a bit shaky but the stories are true.

 

 

 

Tomorrow I’m having a “book-baby!”

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Tomorrow I’m having a “book-baby!”

This is my twelfth “book baby” and one was stillborn 😦  At times I still wonder if that first struggle to write a book could be brought back to life?  It had a rather strange title–“How to Bring about Change Without Everybody Getting Mad at You?”  I guess it didn’t fly then, because I couldn’t find the answer.  The manuscript was all about  being hurt — and what the people who were mad at me–and my husband–did.  Maybe when I turn ninety (next February) I will haul it off the shelf and read through those typed pages again. I suspect the answer would come as I read. God has certainly given me more insight and understanding of relationships after almost fifty more years of living!

I’m not having a big launch party for The Queen’s Daughters.  It’s not that she isn’t worth it — my, the adventures  Katharine Bushnell and Bess Andrews had in India should keep my readers awake! When they both got stuck in Peshawar at the end of the Kyber pass (from Kabul,Afghanistan) I had a hard time getting them out of there myself.

The launch of a twelfth book is something like launching the fifth child in a family. Relatives visit and send cards  and gifts when the first grandchild is born– and in this century the cellphone lines are hot with baby pictures.  But my fifth baby started life on the road in  the back bedroom of our 42-foot trailer as we traveled across the country meeting people and speaking in churches about our youth work in South Africa.  In one church a dear lady felt sorry for our baby, and offered to take him home and care for him the whole week we were there!! (I wish she knew what a godly, sensitive, caring man he turned out to be, and how much he was and is loved by the whole family!)

Well, back to  — THE QUEEN’S DAUGHTERS. She’s my twelfth and fulfills my dream of birthing a book that will challenge readers  with  Kate’s passion and risk-taking efforts to overcome injustice.

Tomorrow– September 1– is the day.  If you enjoyed Daughters of Deliverance you’ll be eager to read the sequel, The Queen’s Daughters. Please write a review at the bottom of the book’s page in Amazon–it helps so much to get the word out to others!